Reproductive Rights Film Festival

The Brooklyn Museum presents the Reproductive Rights Film Festival, a two-day festival presenting the ongoing debate on abortion through film, talkbacks with advocates and introductions by filmmakers on November 8 and 9, 2019.

Reproductive Rights Film Festival

Brooklyn Museum | Park Slope

The Brooklyn Museum presents the Reproductive Rights Film Festival, a two-day festival presenting the ongoing debate on abortion through film, talkbacks with advocates and introductions by filmmakers on November 8 and 9, 2019.

On opening night, directors Ricki Stern and Anne Sundberg introduce their film Reversing Roe (2018, 99 min.), which investigates, through interviews with reproductive rights advocates and opponents, the long-term political campaign to overturn Roe v. Wade. After the film, reproductive justice organizer Senti Sojwal, Planned Parenthood of New York City, moderates a conversation among Stern, Sundberg, and Nancy Northup, President of the Center for Reproductive Rights.

Saturday gives a full day to four important films, one that brings women's healthcare across oceans in Vessel, an amazing film about a mobile clinic on a sailboat. Saturdays schedule begins at 11:00 am:

  • 11 am: Trapped (Dawn Porter, 2016, 81 min.) reveals the work of abortion clinic workers and lawyers after hundreds of regulations known as “TRAP” (Targeted Regulation of Abortion Providers) laws were passed, restricting access to abortions in certain U.S. states.
  • 1 pm: Abortion: Stories Women Tell (Tracy Droz Tragos, 2016, 93 min.) reroutes the abortion debate away from the political realm and toward the perspectives of women, through a range of conversations with women and patients in Missouri. Tracy Droz Tragos introduces the film.
  • 2:45 pm: Conversation Andrea Miller, President of the National Institute for Reproductive Health, joins filmmakers Tracy Droz Tragos, Alessandra Zeka, Holen Kahn, and Diana Whitten.
  • 4 pm: A Quiet Inquisition (Alessandra Zeka and Holen Sabrina Kahn, 2014, 65 min.) focuses on Nicaraguan public hospital OBGYN Dr. Carla Cerrato, who must choose between following a new law that bans all abortions (after Nicaragua’s 130 years of abortion protection), or providing care she knows can save lives. Alessandra Zeka introduces the film.
  • 5:10 pm: Vessel (Diana Whitten, 2014, 90 min.) follows the work of Women on Waves. Housed on a ship, the Dutch pro-choice organization travels around the world to provide safe abortions at sea for women who have no legal alternative—and trains women to give themselves safe abortions. Diana Whitten introduces the film.

 

 

Friday, November 8, 7-9:30 pm
Opening Night: Reproductive Rights Film Festival
Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium, 3rd Floor
Tickets are $16 and include Museum general admission.

In response to recent legislation, award-winning filmmakers unite to present feature films that investigate, explore, and celebrate the various facets of the fight for safe abortion access throughout the country. Opening night includes a screening of Reversing Roe (Ricki Stern and Ann Sundberg, 2018, 99 min.), which investigates the long-term political campaign to overturn Roe v. Wade through interviews with abortion rights advocates and opponents. Directors Ricki Stern and Anne Sundberg will introduce the film and participate in a conversation after the screening with Nancy Northup, President of the Center for Reproductive Rights, moderated by reproductive justice organizer Senti Sojwal.

 

Saturday, November 9, 11 am-7 pm
Reproductive Rights Film Festival
Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium, 3rd Floor
Tickets are $16 and include Museum general admission.

For the second part of this two-day festival, award-winning filmmakers come together to present their films on the fight for safe abortion access, including talkbacks and introductions. Films include Trapped (Dawn Porter, 2016, 81 min.), Abortion: Stories Women Tell (Tracy Droz Tragos, 2016, 93 min.), A Quiet Inquisition (Alessandra Zeka and Holen Sabrina Kahn, 2014, 65 min.), and Vessel (Diana Whitten, 2014, 90 min.).

 

About Brooklyn Museum

The Brooklyn Museum is one of the oldest and largest art museums in the United States. Its roots extend back to 1823 and the founding of the Brooklyn Apprentices’ Library to educate young tradesmen (Walt Whitman would later become one of its librarians). First established in Brooklyn Heights, the Library moved into rooms in the Brooklyn Lyceum building on Washington Street in 1841. Two years later, the Lyceum and the Library combined to form the Brooklyn Institute, offering important early exhibitions of painting and sculpture in addition to lectures on subjects as diverse as geology and abolitionism. The Institute announced plans to establish a permanent gallery of fine arts in 1846.

In recent years, the Museum has focused on redesigning its galleries and reinstalling its major collections to make them more accessible to the public. Flowing spaces, vivid wall colors, dramatic graphic elements, and multimedia components feature in many of these reconfigured galleries. The Museum opened its spectacularly redesigned front entrance and new public plaza on April 17, 2004. With the nineteenth-century Beaux-Arts facade as a backdrop, a two-story glass entrance pavilion, named the Martha A. and Robert S. Rubin Pavilion and Lobby, provides a sense of direct connection between the interior of the building and the exterior surroundings, while bringing natural light into the formerly dark interior. The new 15,000-square-foot glass pavilion, recalling the staircase of the original McKim, Mead & White entrance, combined with the renovated lobby area of nearly 9,000 square feet, creates an entirely new entrance facility that more than doubles the size of the previous lobby area. Among the amenities is a new, full-service Visitor Center offering information, ticketing, and a range of services to the public.

 

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